January 19, 2009

We'll always have Paris

Saw Revolutionary Road yesterday with a posse of literary women (who had no interest in NFL championship games). The theater had a definite female bias....though perhaps the choice of entertainment had something to do with that.

Count me among those not walking out of Rev Road with a feeling of darkness, of doom. Perhaps that is because, in my life, I have taken the cruise to Paris. I am not safely ensconced in the suburbs, I choose (through my self employment, my pursuit of a life dream, my eclectic hobbies, my second and third careers, my refusal to be pigeonholed) to walk outside of the suburban angst, the grey flannel suits, the black / white binary of the world.

So yeah, a dark, sad, film. Not my favorite sort of thing to see. But my soul is pretty safe from whatever shadow this film is casting on suburban, upper middle class Connecticut.....

3 comments:

j said...

Not sad either, albeit ensconced in suburbia myself. I emerged thoughtful. Let's talk further when we see each other again, about my theory of joy/intimacy in the aggregate.
Going to Readers and Writers on Thurs?

Anonymous said...

I was sad. If I fall into the characters and feel what it must be like for them, then the actors have done a good job in my opinion. The acting was very good, so I was sad. But I also must admit that giving up on dreams and not realizing full potential and making compromises and falling into a traditional role and disappointing myself IS something I can relate to and so that hit home. Although the movie was ‘50’s suburbia, the story is really timeless, isn’t it? For those of us who have not been strong enough to go after the “dream”, the movie was a blatant display of what settling for the easy, well worn path can do to a person. And at its worse, what it can do to a person when they can’t take it anymore. But, then again, there are more movies to see and new feelings to feel. So, onward…(J’s friend)

Anonymous said...

i hear you, anonymous, whover you and j r...