March 10, 2017

Doorbells

Once upon a time I could rely on my canine early warning system to alert me to distantly ringing doorbells, arriving delivery trucks, and just about anything else that he considered a threat or an intrusion. Even a doorbell on the radio or television that sounded like the real one would set him off.

In recent months, however, little Elo is slowing down a bit, losing his edge in the hearing department. Several times the doorbell has rung while I've been in the basement and he's not even aware of it. I've taken to keeping an ear out and have even myself wandered upstairs (thinking I've heard the bell) to find nobody there.

So I've scouted out the doorbell wiring (running openly in the basement ceiling) and DIY help on adding a second chime (I'll need to use the existing wiring as a pull wire to run a second feed from the old chime to the new chime)

But pretty simple stuff. I might even do a little audio browsing for a more mellow chime and buy two of those, and replace the more traditional "ding-dong" chime that came with the place.

March 07, 2017

Unusual Birthday Gift

What do you get for a somewhat precocious three year old for his birthday?

My brother suggests, for his son Griffin, "...his own key set if you want to get creative. He loves real keys."

I considered the gauntlet thrown down. Digging around electrical safety / contractor sites, I found a set of lockout padlocks - color coded, differently keyed.

Add some plastic key markers / collars to match (found those on Amazon) and a colorful, kid friendly key ring (to be purchased) and it's a color matching toy, a fine motor control toy, and a key obsession toy!

And since there are two sets of keys I'll make sure to put a second set of keys together for daddy, just in case Griff decides to lock something up secretly and daddy does not discover it until later.

March 04, 2017

Thanks, Mom

Mom passed away back at the end of 2016 . . . and after a flurry of activity as we cleaned out her assisted living and found homes for the things she had brought with her from her condo, we've been slowly finishing the process of settling her fairly simple estate.

Mom did a good job of not leaving a physical or financial mess for us to deal with. We went through the bulk of her possessions as she transitioned into assisted living last summer - I took a few pieces of furniture. But really, nobody wants your parents' stuff. So what remained were the things she used daily, and her memories and keepsakes.

She assigned a destination for her keepsakes - china, silver, jewelry and art while she was alive, and three of us got "assets" - I took her car (a 2010 Chevy Malibu, just 35000 miles on it), my brother purchased her condo (at a low-ball price, with a bunch of mom-funded improvements, her gift to her youngest grandchild), and my sister got her diamond ring (a reasonably pricey rock, who knew dad had it in him). I ended up with the "good china" - 12 settings plus serving pieces that dad ostensibly picked up in Japan when he was stationed there. I really did not want it - lacking a dining room, china cabinet, or the sort of life where I dine with 2 people, never mind 12. But after initially demurring, and noticing mom's palpable disappointment, I told mom I'd take it. I was not going to sell it while she was alive; but I recently price-shopped it on one of those china replacement sites that buy china - and found the offer for this particular set ($1 for a cup & saucer, $2 for a dinner plate) to be so ludicrously low that I'd be paying them (in terms of shipping costs) to take it. So if anyone wants to do a formal dinner.....I'm ready.

Mom was worried about money - but we did a back of the envelope calculation when her health started to fail early in 2016 and knew her money would probably outlast her. So we were happy to spend her savings down to make her comfortable and support her over the last year. Though her time at the assisted living was a bit more expensive (due to her need for personal care towards the end), she left a small sum of money to us as a legacy.

Her will split her assets five ways (four kids, plus one young grandchild); we independently decided to gift the brother who did not get a car / condo / diamond with $10K off the top to even things up. That left us each with about $14K, with another $8K to split via a life insurance policy. We decided to set a bit aside (just in case) as we finalize taxes and such; this past week I received a check for $12K.

It was not what one would consider a "set for life" windfall, but to me it's a wonderful boon - permitting me to completely pay off my consumer debt and to fill my retirement account for 2016. I set up the final credit card payments today, took some time to consolidate all my various monthly payments (a handful of charities, video subscriptions, and digital / office subscriptions) onto one card, and took the opportunity to cancel a few things I was not using (a music subscription, an online fax service, an amazon prime extra). My plan is to close out one of the two credit cards, use the second for subscriptions and online purchases, and pick up a lower cost / more reputable one for travel and "just in case".

It's a good solid "spring cleaning" of my finances - I'll be saving money (avoiding interest payments), reducing my monthly bills (my card payments were maybe $300 just to keep things at status quo), and keeping a better eye on the expenses I do have.  Who knows - maybe I'll even start to save or more fully fund my IRA.

It has felt as if mom were reaching back, to take care of me for one last time. And as I was telling this to a friend on the phone, I noticed a rare feeder visitor - a female cardinal. I'm not much for signs and spirits in general, but mom and her friend June had shared a belief that a cardinal is a representative of a loved one who has passed, and my sister has carried that through her passing, funeral, and over the past few months. I've got a suet feeder going though the colder months, and though I see a regular crew of woodpeckers, nut-hatches, titmouse, sparrows, and grackles, cardinals are not regulars. It felt a little like an affirmation, a blessing. 

So thanks, Mom. While I have not had to rely on your for money for money since right after I went out on my own, knowing you were there was always a comfort. I've been missing you a lot over the past weeks, more so than right after you died.  Know that even in death, you've reached back to take care of us....as you always did. 

Cleaning up the Neighborhood

Was a little brisk to police the neighborhood today, but I was out earlier in the week with the unseasonably warm weather. I thought I had blogged about my habit / custom of picking up the neighborhood, but I see that Facebook sucked that particular energy out of me. So I thought I'd collect some social media musings here in only place . . .


Jan 14, 2013: On nice days like today I grab my litter pick-up tool ($1.99 at Harbor Freight) go pick up trash outside. It makes me feel better about my place and the neighborhood, and I'm all set for a chain gang / community service if it ever comes to that 

Oct 9, 2015: Heading out for my periodic policing of the neighborhood trash. Taking a big bag today because I know there's at least one pizza box out there. #hardhitten #newbritain

Mar 17, 2016: One of my little foibles is patrolling my neighborhood, picking up litter. I have a little litter-picker-upper stick (Harbor Freight) and generally pick up a grocery store bag worth of junk 2-3x a week.

David Sedaris was definitely an inspiration; walking my dog one day and feeling particularly punk about the condition of the area, I got one of those divine hits - who else is going to do it? Me, apparently.....

April 18, 2016: Dear Residents of Planet Earth:

If you are out hiking and eating an apple and chuck the core into the woods, that's cool. We'll take care of it.

If however, you eat an apple every day at lunchtime while you are walking around the neighborhood, take two bites, and chuck the mostly uneaten fruit under the same tree every single day so there's a dozen or so uneaten apples rotting....not cool. Such behavior will be duly noted on your permanent record.

Love, the Management

Dec 31, 2016: In other news, I took a real garbage bag out to do my regular neighborhood litter patrol this morning. I usually can get by with a small grocery store bag, but things had piled up between the snow, the holiday, and my attention being elsewhere. Neighborhood is officially cleaned up in time for 2017....

Now, I am fairly certain that my litter picking had it's roots in the humor of David Sedaris, although my routine predates this New Yorker article - Stepping Out: Living the Fitbit Life. I am, however, a somewhat obsessive listener of public radio that I am sure I'd heard David talk about his own litter picking, planting the seeds of my own habits.

I clearly recall the moment I started - walking the dog, noticing a rather trashed neighborhood of bottles, fast food trash, and other detritus, and thinking somewhat disdainfully "Whose job is it to pick this stuff up?". The answer came back swift and sure in that voice I've come to recognize as my own divine nature "Yours."

And so I venture out once a week or so - as time and weather and need dictate - with an inexpensive pick-up stick and a small plastic bag, and pick up the neighborhood litter. It may have started incrementally - policing the condo property when I took over as president, and expanding outward - now I've got about 1500 feet of city street I consider my turf.



It's a lower middle class neighborhood with a couple of manufacturing facilities - so I get a mix of household trash (fast food, kids meals), smoking material (packaging, cigarette and cigar butts), a reasonably frequent stream of liquor bottles (nips and 500 ml, mostly), and a smattering of soda, beer, and other beverage containers.

I don't recycle stuff (sorry, I have my limits, at least it's off the street), I tend to leave anything natural (including pet waste, branches, apple cores, etc.), and I wander down in front of the nearby apartments only on weekdays (when the tenants cars are not on the street) and when I have room in my bag (tends to be a lot of litter down that way).

I'm sure the neighbors think I'm crazy or scrounging for deposit containers. Although one guy walking his daughter did say simply "thank-you" recently. I have to say it makes me feel better about where I live; and I do scan my turf as I drive to and from home for fresh litter and make a mental note to get out for a clean-up. 


The biggest challenge for me is to send metta, loving kindness, to the folks for whom I am cleaning - the residents, tenants, homeowners, factory workers, and random passersby whose litter I am picking up. It's interesting to watch my mind try to descend into judgement, stereotypes, disdain. On my bad days the dialogue goes like this "the human beings are kind of pigs; glad I'm not one of them". On my good days, still that separation, but more kindness and love - like a mother cleaning up after her kids.